insights unheard of…
Anna Kubelík · Matthew Hawtin

A space related exhibition of installation, drawing and painting
Featuring sound performances by Oliver Schmid [CH]

Currently, no visits possible, even by appointment.
The exhibition was planned from December 2020 through March 2021 – and will now be extended until the end of April.


___EN___

The artistic and content-related subject of the exhibition insights unheard of… by Anna Kubelík and Matthew Hawtin is the experience of the invisible, the perception of what is always around us, but we are not aware of. To this end, installation, drawing and painting meet each other at drj art projects and form a new, obviously organically coherent whole. The works of the two artists literally become measuring instruments and indicators of natural phenomena, that constantly surround us all in our immediate, direct living environment. Together they quickly convey the high level of complexity in technical and handcrafted as well as artistic and conceptual terms. In addition, percussive sound performances by Oliver Schmid expand the sensual experiences of the viewers on the one hand, and the interaction of the installed artistic elements with their concrete space at drj on the other.

___DE___

insights unheard of…
Anna Kubelík · Matthew Hawtin


Eine raumbezogene Ausstellung aus Installation, Zeichnung und Malerei
Mit Klang-Performances von Oliver Schmid [CH]

Derzeit nicht einmal auf Verabredung zu besuchen.
Die geplante Ausstellungszeit war Dezember 2020 bis März 2021. Sie wird nun bis Ende April verlängert.


Das künstlerische wie inhaltliche Thema der Ausstellung  insights unheard of... von Anna Kubelík und Matthew Hawtin ist das erfahrbar machen des Nicht-Sichtbaren, das Wahrnehmen dessen, was stets um uns herum ist, wir uns aber nicht bewusst sind. Dafür begegnen einander bei drj art projects Installation, Zeichnung und Malerei und bilden ein neues, offenkundig organisch anmutendes Ganzes. Die Werke der beiden Künstler*innen werden dabei förmlich zu Messinstrumenten und Anzeigern natürlicher Phänomene, die uns alle stets in unserem unmittelbaren, direkten Lebensraum umgeben. Gemeinsam vermitteln sie sehr schnell die hohe Komplexität in technisch-handwerklicher sowie in künstlerisch-konzeptueller Hinsicht. Zudem erweitern perkussive Klang-Performances von Oliver Schmid die sinnlichen Erfahrungen der Betrachtenden einerseits, wie auch das Zusammenwirken der installierten künstlerischen Elemente mit ihrem konkreten Raum bei drj auf der anderen Seite.


___EN___ [Für den deutschen Text hier klicken!]

The Well-Tempered Hygrometer by artist and architect Anna Kubelík [*1980, CH] is an installative and constructive sculpture from 2013 . The title reveals the hybrid character of the work: On the one hand, the artist has conceived it as a geometric interpretation of Johann Sebastian Bach‘s Well-Tempered Clavier by making very direct and precise references to this work, which is fundamental for keyboard instruments. On the other hand, the construction is a measuring instrument with which changing atmospheric conditions in the surrounding space are indicated. The work‘ conceptual basis is therefore both technically and artistically based on measuring, tempering or tuning – as is done in music – and the capturing and display of invisible environmental conditions in space – which is otherwise performed by technical apparatus.

The sculpture consists of more than four thousand individual parts, which were each cut, filed, drilled, punched and painted several times by hand from ash and pine wood, as well as horsehair, lead weights and aluminium joints.These elements are assembled by the artist to form individually constructed frames in which strings and counterweights balance cantilevered levers – and indicate their change of position. As a spatial installation, this creates a kinetic object more than five metres long as an instrument for depicting changing humidity. [A detailed description of the elements and references of the work can be found here].

Originally developed as a kinetic construction with minimal movement of the projecting levers, Anna Kubelík added the element of water to this ceiling-suspended sculpture in a first evolutionary stage. The presence of water not only influenced the atmospheric conditions around the installation itself, but the artist introduced it into the work as a direct musical element: drops falling from the construction caused xylophone bars placed on the floor to sound .

In the now third and latest version of the work, Anna Kubelík’s aim was to amplify the acoustic element of the installation in a significantly altered way. Together with the drummer and sound artist Oliver Schmid [*1968, CH], she developed a sonic performance from the physical elements of the second version – the xylophone bars, their resonating elements and the wooden boxes individually manufactured for each segment of the hygrometer – whose spatial figuration is precisely related to the exhibition situation at drj. In his 20-minute performance Oliver Schmid brings both the components of the installation and the spaces themselves to sound and resonate through his playing. In addition, a second time level now enters the work: The extremely slow, barely perceptible change in the installation itself – due to the constantly changing humidity – is contrasted in an antipodean way by the short, intense and energetically highly charged performance. In the interaction, an extremely dense result of permanent installation and performance that can be experienced for a short time is being created.

In addition, Oliver Schmid developed a specific sound profile from the tones of the physical elements of this work – wood, lead, bars, horse hair – which can be heard as a 56-channel soundtrack in the exhibition. It is conceptually designed in order to interpret exactly the proportions and proportions of the sculpture and is thus a direct advancement of the function of water from the second version of the work. In this way, the Well-Tempered Hygrometer is now expanded by this integrating sound pattern into an instrument that actually sounds.

Matthew Hawtin’s [*1972, CA] latest painting objects, on the other hand, seek to be virtually hidden in the space and around the installation. Their conceptually minimalist form and the reduced placements, supplemented by selected drawings on his subject, juxtapose the central spatial elements with pointed and subtle components that enhance the exhibition with a far-reaching and topical dimension.

As a direct reference to the global and collective experience that we humans are facing in 2020 with the consequences of the Sars-CoV-2 pandemic, Hawtin has dealt with the permanent presence of invisible and so far rather disregarded microorganisms around us. As a painter, he found a way to transfer this concern to his characteristic polygonal image bases: instead of using his artist colours as usual, he experimented during the lockdown with technical laboratory colourants, which are used in research as a means of detecting, for example, cell structures. This led him to use, for example, Methylene Blue (Loeffler’s) stain [a means of detecting bacteria and leucocytes], Brilliant Cresyl Blue stain [a supravital haematological marker for detecting reticulocytes in peripheral blood smears], Eosyn-Y [a free radical produced by treating a dye with hydrochloric acid to reveal complex cell structures] or Formalin-Nigrosine solution [a staining solution for use in microscopy]. The surfaces created by the interaction of these materials show a fascinating variety of structures, which are immediately reminiscent of the general notions of strongly enlarged cells, microorganisms or bacterial cultures. At the same time, they are aesthetically very convincing, for example in terms of their colour tones in relation to each other and the haptic qualities of the applied layers of coating.

Matthew Hawtin wanted to install the works in places that are completely unusual for exhibitions: Very high, close to the ground and generally in such a way that one almost has to search for the objects in the exhibition and – even if one then has them in front of the eyes – cannot look at them without special effort. This, the artist writes, “…to acknowledge the unknowns that live in the spaces we move through each day…” and “…to recognise the invisible that lurks over our shoulders. The paintings are meant to be watching you before you see them and symbolise this unseen microscopic world…”. Matthew Hawtin expressed these and other personal thoughts in detail as part of his statement on the exhibition [link to text]. They are a conscious expression of the underlying engagement with the invisible life that always surrounds us, but which we usually do not really perceive. Unless it becomes a danger. Or like here – thanks to him – works of art.

Also as a direct consequence of the current restrictions, Matthew Hawtin could not travel from Canada to install the works together with the makers of the drj exhibition. Thus the exact positioning in space took place from a distance, with the help of internet communication in words and pictures – which unintentionally added an equally highly topical component of our new collective experiences to the collaboration. Likewise, the sound performances by Oliver Schmid are not, as it was planned just a few weeks ago, to be experienced publicly and spontaneously, but rather only by appointment at predetermined times. This creates a situation similar to the 1:1 concerts that professional musicians have developed as a way out of the performanceless era. This special quality of experience is therefore also an expression of the unprecedented situation in which we find ourselves at present – in the same way that the exhibition is set up without an opening, fixed opening hours and a clear end date. But it is all the more specific, impressive and important to establish a direct exchange with our audience.

insights unheard of …
Anna Kubelík · Matthew Hawtin


A space related exhibition of installation, drawing and painting
Featuring sound performances by Oliver Schmid [CH]
By appointment only. December 2020 through March 2021





We acknowledge the support of the Canada Council for the Arts

The Canada Council for the Arts is Canada’s public arts funder, with a mandate to foster and promote the study and enjoyment of, and the production of works in, the arts. The Council champions and invests in artistic excellence through a broad range of grants, services, prizes and payments to professional Canadian artists and arts organizations. Its work ensures that excellent, vibrant and diverse art and literature engages Canadians, enriches their communities and reaches markets around the world. The Council also raises public awareness and appreciation of the arts through its communications, research and arts promotion activities. It is responsible for the Canadian Commission for UNESCO, which promotes the values and programs of UNESCO in Canada to contribute to a more peaceful, equitable and sustainable future. The Canada Council Art Bank operates art rental programs and helps further public engagement with contemporary arts.



___DE___

insights unheard of…
Anna Kubelík · Matthew Hawtin

Eine raumbezogene Ausstellung aus Installation, Zeichnung und Malerei
Mit Klang-Performances von Oliver Schmid [CH]

Der Wohltemperierte Hygrometer der Künstlerin und Architektin Anna Kubelík [*1980, CH] ist eine installativ-konstruktive Skulptur aus dem Jahr 2013 [Video hier]. Der Titel offenbart den hybriden Charakter der Arbeit: Zum einen ist sie von der Künstlerin als eine geometrische Interpretation des Wohltemperierten Klaviers von Johann Sebastian Bach angelegt, indem sie sehr direkte und genaue Bezüge auf dieses für Tasteninstrumente grundlegende Werk des Komponisten nimmt. Darüber hinaus ist die Konstruktion aber ein Messinstrument, mit der wechselnde atmosphärische Verhältnisse im Raum angezeigt werden. Begrifflich wie künstlerisch sind insofern das Einmessen, das Temperieren bzw. Stimmen – wie es in der Musik geschieht – sowie das Aufnehmen und Anzeigen von unsichtbaren Umweltbedingungen im Raum – das ansonsten von technischen Apparaten geleistet wird – die konzeptionellen Grundlagen des Werkes. 

Die Skulptur besteht aus mehr als viertausend Einzelteilen, die aus Eschen- und Pinienholz einzeln und händisch geschnitten, gefeilt, gebohrt, gestanzt und mehrmals lackiert wurden, sowie aus Rosshaar, Bleigewichten und Aluminiumverbindungen. Diese Elemente sind von der Künstlerin zu individuell konstruierten Rahmen zusammengefügt, in denen Saiten und Gegengewichte auskragenden Hebel in Balance halten – und deren Positionsveränderung anzeigen. Als Rauminstallation entsteht daraus ein mehr als fünf Meter langes kinetisches Objekt als Instrument zum Abbilden wechselnder Luftfeuchtigkeit. [Eine genaue Beschreibung zu den Elementen und Bezügen des Werks findet sich hier].

Ursprünglich als eine kinetische Konstruktion mit minimalen Bewegungen der auskragenden Hebel entwickelt, erweiterte Anna Kubelík diese deckenhängende Skulptur in einer ersten Evolutionsstufe um das Element Wasser. Dieses beeinflusste durch seine Anwesenheit nicht nur die atmosphärischen Verhältnisse im Umfeld der Installation selbst, sondern wurde von der Künstlerin insbesondere als direktes musikalisches Element in die Arbeit eingebracht: Von der Konstruktion fallende Tropfen brachten auf dem Boden platzierte Xylophonstäbe zum Klingen [Video hier]. 

In der nun dritten und neuesten Version der Arbeit war es Ziel von Anna Kubelík, das akustische Element der Installation deutlich verändert zu verstärken. Gemeinsam mit dem Schlagzeuger und Klangkünstler Oliver Schmid [*1968, CH] entwickelte sie aus den physischen Elementen der zweiten Fassung – also den Xylophonstäben, ihren Resonanzkörpern sowie den zu jedem Segment des Hygrometers einzeln gefertigten Holzboxen – eine Klangperformance, deren räumliche Figuration genau auf die Ausstellungssituation bei drj bezogen ist. So bringt Oliver Schmid in seiner etwa 20-minütigen Aufführung durch sein Spiel jeweils sowohl die Bestandteile der Installation wie auch die Räume selbst zum Klingen und Resonieren. Zudem fließt nun eine zweite Zeitebene in das Werk ein: Der äußerst langsamen, kaum wahrnehmbaren Veränderung der Installation an sich – durch die sich permanent ändernde Luftfeuchtigkeit – steht die kurze, intensive und energetisch hoch aufgeladene Performance vom Wesen her antipodisch gegenüber. Im Zusammenwirken entsteht ein äußerst dichtes Ergebnis aus dauerhafter Installation und kurzzeitig erlebbarer Performance.

Zudem entwickelte Oliver Schmid aus den Klängen der physischen Elemente dieser Arbeit – Holz, Blei, Klangstäbe, Pferdehaare – ein spezifisches Klangbild, das als 56-Kanal Tonspur in der Ausstellung zu hören ist. Es ist konzeptionell so angelegt, dass es genau die Verhältnisse und Proportionen der Skulptur interpretiert und insofern eine direkte Weiterentwicklung der Funktion des Wassers aus der zweiten Version der Arbeit ist. So erweitert sich der Wohltemperierte Hygrometer durch dieses integrierende Klangbild nun zu einem tatsächlich klingenden Instrument. 


Die neusten Malereiobjekte von Matthew Hawtin [*1972, CA] hingegen, suchen sich quasi im Raum und um die Installation herum zu verbergen. Ihre konzeptuell minimal angelegte Gestalt und die zurückgenommenen Platzierungen, ergänzt durch ausgewählte Zeichnungen zu seinem Thema, stellen den raumgreifenden Elementen im Zentrum pointierte und hintergründige Komponenten gegenüber, die der Ausstellung eine weiterreichende und aktuelle inhaltliche Dimension verleihen. 

Als eine direkte Referenz an die globale und kollektive Erfahrung, die wir Menschen im Jahr 2020 mit den Auswirkungen der Sars-CoV-2 Pandemie machen müssen, hat sich Hawtin mit der permanenten Anwesenheit von unsichtbaren und bislang eher wenig beachteten Mikroorganismen um uns herum beschäftigt. Als Maler fand er einen Weg, diese Auseinandersetzung auf seine für ihn charakteristischen polygonalen Bildträger zu übertragen: Anstelle wie üblich seine Künstlerfarben zu verwenden, experimentierte er während des Lockdowns mit technischen Laborfarben, die als Mittel zum Nachweis, beispielsweise von Zellstrukturen, in der Forschung eingesetzt werden. So kam er dazu, etwa Methylene Blue (Loeffler’s) stain [ein Mittel um Bakterien und Leukozyten nachzuweisen], Brilliant Cresyl Blue stain [eine supravitale hämatologische Markierung zur Erfassung von Retikulozyten in peripheren Blutausstrichen], Eosyn-Y [ein freies Radikal, das durch die Behandlung eines Farbstoffes mit Salzsäure zur Darstellung komplexer Zellstrukturen hergestellt wird] oder Formalin-Nigrosin Lösung [eine Färbelösung zum Einsatz in der Mikroskopie] zu verwenden. Die durch das Zusammenwirken dieser Materialien entstehenden Oberflächen zeigen eine faszinierende Vielfalt von Strukturen, die unmittelbar an die allgemeinen Vorstellungen von stark vergrößerten Zellen, Mikroorganismen oder Bakterienkulturen erinnern. Zugleich sind sie ästhetisch sehr überzeugend, was etwa ihre Farbklänge zueinander sowie die haptischen Qualitäten der aufgetragenen Farbschichten betrifft.

Installieren wollte Matthew Hawtin die Werke an für Ausstellungen gänzlich ungewöhnlichen Stellen: Sehr hoch, nahe am Boden und allgemein so, dass man die Objekte in der Ausstellung beinahe suchen muss, und sie – selbst wenn man sie dann vor Augen hat – nicht ohne besondere Anstrengung betrachten kann. Dies, so schreibt der Künstler, „…um so die Unbekannten zu würdigen, die in den Räumen leben, durch die wir uns täglich bewegen…“ sowie „…als eine Möglichkeit, das Unsichtbare, das über unseren Schultern lauert, zu erkennen. Die Gemälde sollen uns beobachten, bevor wir sie sehen, und diese unsichtbare mikroskopische Welt symbolisieren…“. Diese und weitere persönliche Gedanken hat Matthew Hawtin in seinem Statement zur Ausstellung ausführlich formuliert [link zum Text]. Sie sind ein bewusster Ausdruck der zugrundeliegenden Auseinandersetzung mit dem Nicht-Sichtbaren Leben, welches uns zwar stets umgibt, das wir aber normalerweise nicht wirklich wahrnehmen. Es sei denn, es wird zur Gefahr. Und nun durch ihn zu Kunstwerken.

Auch als eine direkte Folge der aktuellen Restriktionen konnte Matthew Hawtin nicht aus Kanada anreisen, um die Werke gemeinsam mit den Ausstellungsmacher*innen von drj zu installieren. So fand die genaue Ortsfindung im Raum aus der Ferne statt, mithilfe von Internetkommunikation in Wort und Bild – was der Zusammenarbeit ungewollt eine ebenfalls hochaktuelle Komponente unserer neuen kollektiven Erfahrungen hinzufügte. Ebenso sind die Klang-Aufführungen von Oliver Schmid nicht, wie es noch vor wenigen Wochen geplant war, öffentlich und spontan zu erleben, sondern nur nach Anmeldung zu vorher festgelegten Zeiten. Dadurch entsteht eine Situation wie etwa bei den 1:1-Konzerten, die professionelle Musiker als Ausweg aus der aufführungslosen Zeit entwickelt haben. Diese besondere Qualität des Erlebens ist somit ebenfalls ein Ausdruck der beispiellosen Situation, in der wir uns derzeit befinden – desgleichen, dass die Ausstellung ohne Eröffnung, feste Öffnungszeiten und klares Enddatum angesetzt ist. Doch umso spezifischer, eindrücklicher und wichtig ist es, darüber mit unserem Publikum in einen direkten Austausch zu kommen.

insights unheard of…
Anna Kubelík · Matthew Hawtin
Eine raumbezogene Ausstellung aus Installation, Zeichnung und Malerei
Mit Klang-Performances von Oliver Schmid [CH]
Derzeit nur auf Verabredung zu besuchen. Ausstellungszeit Dezember 2020 bis März 2021




Wir danken für die Unterstützung des Canada Council for the Arts

Das Canada Council for the Arts ist Kanadas öffentlicher Kunstförderer mit dem Auftrag, das Studium und die Freude an den Künsten sowie die Produktion von Kunstwerken zu fördern und zu unterstützen. Das Council setzt sich für künstlerische Spitzenleistungen ein und investiert in diese durch ein umfangreiches Angebot an Stipendien, Zuwendungen, Preisen und Zuschüssen für professionelle kanadische Künstler*innen und Kunstorganisationen. Seine Arbeit stellt sicher, dass exzellente, lebendige und vielfältige Kunst und Literatur die Kanadier mit einbezieht, ihre Gemeinschaften bereichert und Märkte auf der ganzen Welt erreicht. Durch seine Kommunikations-, Forschungs- und Kunstförderungsaktivitäten stärkt das Council auch das öffentliche Bewusstsein und die Wertschätzung der Künste. ​Es ist verantwortlich für die Kanadische UNESCO-Kommission, die die Werte und Programme der UNESCO in Kanada fördert, um zu einer friedlicheren, gerechteren und nachhaltigeren Zukunft beizutragen. Die Canada Council Art Bank betreibt Kunstverleihprogramme und fördert das öffentliche Engagement für zeitgenössische Kunst.